Suffolk Witchcraft – Executions

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The 124 individuals accused of witchcraft in Suffolk in 1645 came from 44 different villages and three market towns, scattered around the county. Two witches were accused in the small market town of Stowmarket, eleven witches were accused in both Framlingham and Glemham, seven in Halesworth, six in Rattlesden and Bramford, five in Wickham and four each in Bacton, Hintlesham and Copdock. Members of the same family were linked together as witches in a few cases and occasionally accused individuals, in their confession, implicated other locals or persons in an adjacent village. Some 32 cases took the form of single cases in individual villages. (Taken from http://www.witchfinders.co.uk/suffolk.pdf)  As the witch hunting momentum grew, self-appointed ‘witchfinder generals’ sprung up around Britain, devoted to extracting confessions of guilt. Matthew Hopkins, the most notorious of these, was responsible for one fifth of the total number of executions in England over the period. One of his targets, John Lowes, was the elderly vicar of Brandeston who was accused of witchcraft in 1642. After being ‘swum’ in the moat at Framlingham Castle, and proclaimed guilty after floating to the surface, Hopkins “kept [Lowes] awake several nights together while running him backwards and forwards about his cell until out of breath… till he was weary of his life and scarce sensible of what he said or did”. Ultimately, Lowes ‘confessed’ to sending imps to sink a ship near Harwich and allegedly proclaimed that he “was joyfull to see what power his imps had”. Lowes was hanged at Bury St Edmunds in August 1645. All Saints Church has a plaque dedicated to Lowes and an image of his hanging is depicted on the village sign. Framlingham Castle and moat are still open to the public. (Taken from http://www.historyextra.com/witchcraft) John Holt of Redgrave, became a judge, he advised juries to acquit supposing witches.  In the church of St Mary at Redgrave is a monument to the Lord Chief Justice who died in 1710.  He acquitted Mother Munnings during 1694. 1599 Doll Bartham and Joan Jorden  Doll Bartham allegedly sends toads to torment Joan Jorden in her bed and prevent her from from sleeping. Jorden throws the first toad into the middle of the room, but it comes back and sits croaking by her bed. She then throws it out the window. Proof that real bewitchment happens, in support of John Darrell’s claims that he has dispossessed genuinely possessed people, is presented in the form of a report detailing Doll Bartham’s alleged bewitchment of Joan Jordan.  Doll Barthram allegedly has a falling out with Joan Jorden. Jorden refused to give her some goods belonging to her master, Symon Fox, and Barthram bewitched her in revenge.  Joan Jorden is allegedly visited by a second toad a few days after Doll Barthram sent the first. Jorden has this one removed from her chamber and burnt.  Doll Barthram allegedly sends a third and final toad to torment Joan Jorden. Jorden, having been advised to burn this one herself, picks it up and carries it out of her chamber, but falls down the stairs along the way and is knocked unconscious. Her employer, Symon Fox, takes the toad and puts it in the fire on her behalf. When it begins to burn, a flame appears at the foot of the stairs, and burns so fiercely it seems to threaten the house, but causes no damage.  The spirit Gyles allegedly answers onlookers’ questions. He claims that he comes for Joan Jorden’s life, that he will kill her the next day, and that fellow familiar J. will tear her to pieces. He adds that he will take Jorden’s soul, in addition to her life. When John Sheereman tells him he shall not have Jorden’s life, Gyles says he will have Sheereman’s instead.  The familiar Gyles claims that Doll Bartham ordered him and fellow familiars Tom and J. to kill Caver’s wife. Gyles initially tried to drown her by leading her into a flooded ditch, but the water only went up to her chin. They hung her instead. Tom put the rope “vnder her chaps, not about her neck: and the noose was so bigge, that three mens heds might haue slipt through it at once.” The spirit Gyles claims that he “killed a child, in the womb of the mother, by nipping out the braines; and that hee entred into another partie and killed him, by tearing his heart in peeces” at Doll Bartham’s orders. His claim is supported by the woman’s delivery of a stillborn child and the man’s strange death not long after.  The spirit Gyles claims that he “ould kill Ione, and teare Iohn Sheereman in pieces; that he was their God; and that he would not be content with the life of Ioane only, but would haue also the liues of Fox, his wife, children, and cattell, and that by the commaundement of Doll Bartharm.”  Doll Bartham allegedly bewitches Joan Jorden, causing her to have fits and be possessed. Jorden is seen to have a lump the size of a man fist moving around her body and settle at her throat. When bound to a chair for being unruly in her fits, she struggles so hard it breaks, and requires six men to wrestle her into and keep her in another chair.  Joan Jorden is visited once again by the spirit Gyles, who heralds his arrival with “a great stroke on the bordes, like the fall of a greate stone.” This awakens Jorden, who cries for help; a thick shadow is then seen to go up her bed. Moments later, she is violently thrown out of the bed and against the wall. She is found under the bed, and it takes four men to pull her out again due to her unnatural weight. Her eyes are seen to sink into her head, her head bends backwards almost to her hips, she lays as dead, and her mouth his stuck shut. She does not respond even when a dry rush is put into her nostrils, nor when aqua vitae is poured down her throat.  Joan Jordan is heard to cry out ” Barthram, thou hast killed mee” while in the throes of a fit. This is witnessed by numerous onlookers.  A spirit in the shape of a cat, answering to the name of Gyles, allegedly begins to torment Joan Jorden. He comes into her room around 11 o’clock at night “first scraping on the wals, then knocking, after that shufling in the rushes: and then (as his vsuall maner was) he clapped the maide on the cheekes about halfe a skore times as to awake her; and, (as oft times els he did) he kissed her 3. or 4. times and slauered on her.” He then lies on her breast and presses her until she cannot speak. Later, he holds “her handes that she could not stirre, and restrayned her voice that she could not answer.  The spirit Gyles also allegedly appears to Joan Jorden in the shape of “a thick darke substance about a foote high; like to a sugar lofe, white on the top.” He speaks in an audible voice, witnessed by numerous people who hear both Gyles and Joan speaking at the same time and become convinced it is not counterfeited. These witnesses include John Sheereman and Symon Fox.  The spirit Gyles also allegedly appears to Joan Jorden in the shape of “a thick darke substance about a foote high; like to a sugar lofe, white on the top.” He speaks in an audible voice, witnessed by numerous people who hear both Gyles and Joan speaking at the same time and become convinced it is not counterfeited. These witnesses include John Sheereman and Symon Fox. Source: (http://witching.org/brimstone/detail.php?mode=oldcounty&county=Suffolk). 1645 Mother Lakeland. Mother Lakeland confesses to sending one of her familiars that appears in the shape of a dog to torment Mr. Lawrence and his child. The familiar torments Mr. Lawrence first and kills him, and then torments and kills the child.  Mother Lakeland confesses to sending a mole familiar to torment and kill Mrs. Jenings, after she refused to lend Lakeland a pin. Lakeland was also trying to avoid paying off a debt of one shilling.  Mother Lakeland allegedly sent one of her imps to kill Mr. Beale. The imp only succeeded in tormenting him, forcing him to live as his body rots.  9th September 1645, Mother Lakeland is approached by the Devil. He tells her that if she will serve him, she shall never want again. After approaching her with this offer on several occasions, Mother Lakeland consents, at which point receives three imps, two little dogs, and a mole from the Devil.  Mother Lakeland confesses to murdering her husband, Anonymous 45. After making a pact with the Devil, Lakeland bewitches her husband, causing him to suffer in misery for a while and then die. Mother Lakeland is burned to death on September 9, 1645. She is condemned for murdering her husband and for several others by witchcraft. Source: (http://witching.org/brimstone/detail.php?mode=oldcounty&county=Suffolk). 1655 Amy Denny & Rose Cullender  Ann Sandeswell gives deposition in court alleging that, seven or eight years ago, she had bought a number of geese from Amy Denny but had not yet brought them home, and that Denny threatened to destroy them if she didn’t come pick them up. A few days later, all the geese were dead.  Ann Sandeswell gives deposition alleging that a quarter-barrel of fish she had ordered from her brother was discovered to have fallen into the ocean when Sandeswell went to collect it. She had requested Amy Denny’s company, and Denny rebuffed her. Her brother told her that he had been unable to keep the fish in the boat, that he had never before seen the like, and that no-one else’s goods had been lost. 1661- Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he would have his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah read from the New Testament in between fits and observed that “they would read till they came to the Name of Lord, or Jesus, or Christ; and then before they could pronounce either of the said Words they would suddenly fall into their fits. But when they came to the Name of Satan, or Devil, they would clap their Fingers upon the Book, crying out, This bites, but makes me speak right well.” The girls claim that Amy Denny has told them they must not name the Lord or Jesus, and claim that Denny appeared to them along with Rose Cullender during their fits, threatening them with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen or heard.  Margaret Arnold gave deposition in court that Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy claimed to see Rose Cullender and Amy Denny after their fits. On one occasion, Deborah said that Amy Denny had tried to convince her to commit suicide. At another, both girls cried out complaining that Cullender and Denny had set their imps on them, and demanded to know why they didn’t torment them themselves. 1661, November 2 – Samuel Pacy (http://www.lowestoftwitches.com/samuel%20pacy.htm) gives deposition that his older daughter, Elizabeth Pacy, began to have fits two days after Amy Denny was thrown in the stocks. Elizabeth’s mouth could not be opened to let her breathe, and Pacy is forced to have one of her teeth broken out so she can get air. Not long after, Deborah Pacy is similarly afflicted, and must also have a tooth tapped out. Both girls claim to have seen apparitions of Amy Denny, accompanied by an unknown woman whose appearance and clothes they describe, during their fits.  Samuel Pacy gives deposition alleging that his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy have numerous violent fits over a two month period. During these fits, their bodies become so sore they cannot be touched, go lame on one side, or lose sight or hearing. At the end of each fit, they each were said to cough up phlegm intermixed with pins and nails.  1661, November 30 – Margaret Arnold, Samual Pacy’s sister, gives deposition stating that she had the care of Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy for a time during their bewitchment. She alleges that she thought they had been faking the vomiting of pins and nails, and had all pins removed from their clothing upon their arrival at her home, but that they had nevertheless vomited pins several times in her presence. She said the girls had claimed to have the pins forced on them by bees and flies.  1661, October 10 – Samuel Pacy gives deposition in court alleging that, the previous October, his younger daughter Deborah suddenly became lame, and remained so for seven days. On the seventh day, Amy Denny came to the Pacy home and attempted to buy herrings. She was sent away three times; the third time she left grumbling discontentedly. At the same moment, Pacy claims Deborah was taken with violent fits of extreme pain in her stomach, as if pricked by pins, and shrieked dreadfully.  1661, October 28 – Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that, while Amy Denny was in the stocks, Alice Letteridge and Jane Buxton approached her, demanded to know the cause of Deborah Pacy’s affliction, and told Denny that she was suspected to be the cause herself. Denny replied that Pacy was making a great deal of fuss over his daughter, and that when her child had suffered a similar affliction, she had tapped out a tooth to feed it. Letteridge and Buxton confirmed this account in their own depositions.  1661, October 30 – Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he consulted with a local physician, Dr. Feavor, on the matter of Deborah’s fits. He reports that Dr. Feavor observed Deborah in her fits but could not diagnose her affliction. Dr. Feavor corroborates Pacy’s report in his own deposition  1662, February 1 – Diana Bocking gives deposition alleging that her daughter Jane Bocking has suffered fits since February, in which she has stomach pains like the pricking of pins, swoons, can eat little or no food, and daily vomits crooked pins. Diana claims that she has found more pins and a lath-nail clenched in Jane’s fists after Jane is seen to catch at the air with her hands. Jane is also said to talk to unseen persons, complain that Rose Cullender and Amy Denny appeared to her, and be stricken dumb. Diana produced the pins and lath-nail as evidence in court. 1662, February 2 – Mary Chandler alleges in her deposition that the morning after she had searched Rose Cullender, her daughter Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender take her hand. Susan is said to have fallen sick to her stomach shortly thereafter, having fits in which she saw apparitions of Rose Cullender with a large dog, vomited pins and was stricken with blindness or dumbness.  1662, March 10 –  Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that Amy Denny bewitched her infant son William, causing him to be afflicted with strange fits. She says that she had argued with Denny after leaving William in Denny’s care with explicit instructions not to give him suck, only to return home and find out that Denny had done so. Denny threatened Durent, and told her “she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her.” That same night, William had his first fit. Dorothy Durent gives deposition stating that she followed Dr. Jacob’s advice to hang William’s blanket in the chimney corner. She alleges that when she went to wrap William in the blanket that night, a great toad fell out and ran up and down the hearth. She had a youth of her household catch the toad and hold it in the fire with tongs. As soon as the toad was in the fire, it made a “made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard.” When the Court asked whether there was any residue of the toad left in the fire, Dorothy said that after the flash and noise, not a thing remained of the creature.  Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that the day after the toad fell out of William’s blanket and she had it burnt, Amy Denny’s niece (Anonymous 389), a neighbor of Durent’s, told her that Denny was “in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire.” Durent says that she called on Denny herself, and found her exactly as Denny’s niece had said – “her Face, her Leggs, and Thighs, which this Deponent saw, seemed very much scorched and burnt with Fire.” When asked how she came by the burns, Denny replied that she must thank Durent for her condition, and that Durent would live to see some of her children dead.  Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that, after her son William recovered from his fits, her ten-year-old daughter Elizabeth became afflicted with similar fits. Dorothy reports that Elizabeth complained she had seen apparitions of Amy Denny during her fits, and that Denny was the cause of her afflictions.  Dorothy Durent reports in her deposition that her daughter Elizabeth died following her illness, and claims it came to pass two days after Denny predicted Elizabeth’s demise. Durent accuses Denny of having bewitched Elizabeth to death, alleging that Denny “hath been long reputed to be a Witch, and a person of very evil behaviour, whose Kindred and Relations have been many of them accused for Witchcraft, and some of them have been Condemned.” 1665 – Ann Sandeswell gives deposition that shortly after Amy Denny destroys some geese Sandeswell had bought from her, Denny became a tenant of Sandeswell’s husband Cornelius. Sandeswell alleges that Denny told Cornelius that the chimney on the house would fall if it wasn’t looked after, to which he replied that the chimney was new and payed her no heed. Not long after, the chimney fell as predicte. Source: (http://witching.org/brimstone/detail.php?mode=oldcounty&county=Suffolk). List of Witch Trails in Suffolk, UK. 1422-71 Margery Jourdemayn of Eye of Suffolk. 1499 Agnes Clerk of Suffolk. 1599 Joane Naylor of Suffolk. 1599 Oliffe Bartham (Doll Bartham) of Stradbroke (Shadbrook) of Suffolk was excuted at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk for sending three toads to destroy the rest (sleep) of Jone Jordan. 1599 Jone Jordan (Joan Jorden) of Stradbroke (Shadbrook) of Suffolk trial at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1599  Joane Nayle trail at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1600-1608 executed in Great Britian. 1644 ‘Mother’ Hovey of  Hadleigh of Suffolk. 1664 Rose Cullender of Lowestoft of Suffolk. 1664  Amy Duny of Lowestoft of Suffolk. 1645 ‘Goodwife’ Low of Suffolk. 1645 Alice Marsh of Suffolk. 1645 ‘Goodwife’ Mills of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Alderman of Chattisham was hanged at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins. 1645 Anne Ansom of Brandeston of Suffolk. 1645 Nathaniel Bacon of Chattisham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Bacon of Chattisham of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Barker of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Margaret Bayts of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Joan Beales of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Becket of Suffolk. 1645 Meribell Bedford of Rattlesden of Suffolk. 1645 Margaret Bennett of Bacton of Suffolk. 1645 Bridget Bigsby of Hintlesham of Suffolk. 1645 ‘Mother’ Binkes of Haverhill of Suffolk. 1645 Ellen Bishop of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Margery Blake of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Boreham of Sudbury of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Brame of Wickham of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Bray of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Bush of Bacton of Suffolk. 1645 John Bysack of Gt. Waldringfield of Suffolk. 1645 Henry Cane of Rattlesden of Suffolk. 1645 Henry Carre of Rattlesden of Suffolk – died in Bury St Edmunds Gaol. 1645 John Chambers of Bramford of Suffolk. 1645 Margery Chinnery  of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Rose Clamfield of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Thomas Clarke of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Clowes of Yoxford  – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1645 Priscilla Collit of Dunwich of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Cricke of Hitcham of Suffolk. 1645 Ellen Crisp of Sweffling of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Dacon of Playford of Suffolk. 1645 Alice Denham of Ipswich of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk 1645 Susan Dexe of Westhorpe of Suffolk. 1645 Elisabeth Dickes of Rattlesden of Suffolk. 1645 Ellen Driver of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Margaret Eccleston of Linstead of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Edwards of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Ellis of Metingham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Emmerson of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1645 James Emmerson of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1645 Thomas Everard of Halesworth of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 Mary Everard of Halesworth of Suffolk – wife of Thomas, hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 Mariana Everard of Halesworth of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Fillet of Wetherden of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Finch of Wattisham of Suffolk. 1645 Katherine Fooley at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Richard Forman of Stowmarket of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Fuller of Combs of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds. 1645 Mary Godard of Belstead of Suffolk. 1645 Elisabeth Greene of Wingfield of Suffolk. 1645 Sybil Greene of Wickham of Suffolk. 1645 Ellen Greenliefe of Bacton of Suffolk. 1645 Abre Grimset of Dunwich of Suffolk. 1645 Grace Gunburgh of Wetherden of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Hammer of Creeting of Suffolk. 1645 Nicolas Hempstead of Creeting of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 Elisabeth Hubarb of Halesworth of Suffolk. 1645 Elisabeth Hubbard of Stowmarket of Suffolk. 1645 William Keeble of Stowmarket of Suffolk. 1645 Judith Kettle of Flowton of Suffolk. 1645 ‘One’ King of Acton of Suffolk. 1645 Joan Lakeland of St Stephens at Ipswich of Suffolk – Burned for witchcraft at Ipswich. 1645 Anne Leech at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk  – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft.t 1645 Margaret Legat of Playford of Suffolk. 1645 Jane Limstead (Linstead) of Halesworth of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds of Sufolk. 1645 John Lowes at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – 70 year old parson from Brandeston, Hung for witchcraft on the evidence of Matthew Hopkins. 1645 Elisabeth Man of Wickham of Suffolk. 1645 Susan Marchant of Hintlesham of Suffolk. 1645 Alice Marsh of Bramford of Suffolk 1645 Susan Manners of Copdock of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1645 Faith Mills of Fressingfield of Suffolk was hanged after confessing to having three familiars 1645 Good Miles of Stowmarket of Suffolk. 1645 Margaret Mixter of Shotley of Suffolk. 1645 James More of Halesworth of Suffolk. 1645 Rebecca Morris of Chattisham – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds. 1645 Alice Muntford of Copdock of Suffolk. 1645 ‘Goodwife’ Mills of Suffolk. 1645 ‘Mother’ Orvis of Rattlesden of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Palmer of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Rose Parker of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1645 ‘One’ Payne of Bramford of Suffolk. 1645 Joan Potter of Hintlesham of Suffolk. 1645 Margaret Powell of Stowmarket of Suffolk. 1645 Rebecca Prick of Belstead of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Randall of Lavenham of Suffolk. 1645 Thomazine Ratcliffe of Shelley of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Richmond of Bramford of Suffolk. 1645 Jane Rivers at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Jane Rivett of Copdock of Suffolk Tried by Matthew Hopkin and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1645 Joane Ruce  of Polstead of Suffolk. 1645 John Scarfe of Rattlesden of Suffolk. 1645 Susan Scot of Lavenham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Scrutton of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Sexton of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1645 Rachel Sexton of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Sexton of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Skipper of Copdock of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 Mary Skinner at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Mary Skipper of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Smith of Glemham of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Smith of Glemham of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 ‘Goody Smith of Bramford of Suffolk. 1645 Susanna Smith of Rushmere of Suffolk. 1645 Elizabeth Southerne of Dunwich of Suffolk. 1645 Margery Sparham of Mendham of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. 1645 Mary Sparham at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Sarah Spindler of Halesworth of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August 1645 Sarah Spinlow at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Susan Stetgold of Suffolk. 1645 Alexander Sussums of Long Melford of Suffolk. Grandmother, mother and Aunt of Alexander. 1645 Margery Sutton of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1645 Lydia Taylor of Bramford of Suffolk. 1645 Katherine Tooly of Westleton – hanged at Bury St Edmunds on 27th August. (maybe the same as Katherine Fooley?) 1645 Anne Usher of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Elisabeth Warne of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 Alice Warner of Rushmere of Suffolk. 1645 Sarah Warner of Suffolk. 1645 Elisabeth Watcham  of Bacton of Suffolk. 1645 Francis Wildes of Blaxhall of Suffolk. 1645 Barbara Wilkinson of Suffolk. 1645 Mary Winter of Wickham of Suffolk. 1645 Alice Wright of Hitcham of Suffolk. 1645 Anne Wright at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Tried by Matthew Hopkins and hung for witchcraft. 1645 Margaret Wyard  of Framlingham of Suffolk. 1645 unnamed woman of Rattlesdden hanged at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1645 7 hanged at Aldeburgh of Suffolk. 1646  Suffolk – Estimated 124 people accused by Matthew Hopkins. 68 were hung. 1646 Louis at Suffolk was executed. 1647 Janet Rivet of Copdock of Suffolk – hanged at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1654 Mother Lakeland at Ipswich of Suffolk – accused of witchcraft and of murdering her husband. Burned at the stake. 1655 Boram at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk – Mother and daughter hung for witchcraft. 1664  (1662) Rose Cullender of Lowestoft of Suffolk – Hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds. 1664 (1662) Amy Duny (Denny) Lowestoft of Suffolk – Hung for witchcraft at Bury St Edmunds. 1693 ‘Widow’ Chambers of Suffolk. 1694 Margaret Elnore at Ipswich of Suffolk – Accused of fortune telling that resulted in someone’s dead, Acquitted by Justice Sir John Holt for accepting familiars from her grandmother who was hanged for witchcraft, having witches marks and giving flice to her neighbours. 1694 Grandmother Elnor of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1694 Aunt of Margaret Elnore of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1694 Mother Munnings of Hartis of Suffolk – Acquitted by Sir John Holt on prognostication causing death or for casting a spell to cause the death of her landlord.  Accused of having a familiar imp in the shape of a pole cat and two black and white imps in the shape of balls of wool at Bury St Edmunds of Suffolk. 1744 old Winter of Ipswich of Suffolk. 1795 Greygoose of Stanningfield, Suffolk. 1825 Isaac Stebbing of Wickham Skeith of Suffolk. 1890 Old Nan Barrett of Eye of Suffolk. No date Margaret Bayle No date Margaret Benet No date Katherine Jarvis of Woodbridge of Suffolk.   The Discovery of Witches, by Matthew Hopkins http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14015/14015-h/14015-h.htm The Tryal of Witches at Bury St Edmunds 1965. The date is wrong, but to find a full document on the Tryal of Witches at Bury St Edmunds, click here.   For more information on: History of Witchcraft Malleus Maleficarum The Witch Finder General How to tell a witch Witch trials Please go to my previous article here For more information on ritual objects, please see Norfolk Witchcraft.

 

References List of Witch executions http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/vatican/esp_vatican29a.htm http://www.hulford.co.uk/date.html http://www.featherlessbiped.com/burning/burnwit5.htm http://www.sacred-texts.com/pag/burning.htm http://www.hulford.co.uk/county.html http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/witchtrial/eis.html http://www.freewebs.com/witchcrafttrail/witchlist.htm http://www.cleo.net.uk/consultants_resources/history/pendlewit/datalist.htm http://www.gippeswic.demon.co.uk/persecution.html http://people.tribe.net/79e63ed1-8c33-46d0-a868-acc0f98d1197/blog/c08d7a17-33b4-4211-beab-e1437eb10f9a#

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  1. Pingback: Suffolk Witchcraft – Executions | All things Paranormal | Scoop.it·

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